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I was particularly excited for my Birdathon this year as it provided me with my first opportunity to see how many species I could find in one day in my new home in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Being such as small country, I could go “coast to coast” from the North Sea to the west to the shores of the man-made Makermeer east of the city with just my bike and one half-hour return train trip. This year also marked my first “green” Birdathon – done wholly by public transit, bike and on foot. The decision to make May 15 the big day was a bit last minute – read 10:20 the night before when I checked the weather forecast for the coming week – and hence some aspects of the day were rather impromptu, but hey, that just adds to the fun right?

At 6:00am I arrived at Central Station where I bought the bicycle supplement for my train ticket to Zaandvort – Noord station. I was counting on the southern sector of Zuid-Kennemerland National Park to account for the bulk of my forest/dune scrub species and I had an good start quickly picking up common forest species such as Song Thrush, Common Nightingale, Eurasian Blackcap, Eurasian Jay and Great and Eurasian Blue Tits as I made my way to what I thought was the park entrance I wanted. Upon arrival it became apparent that there were no bike paths at this entrance so I backtracked about 15minutes to a different access point. This proved to be an excellent “set back” as in short order I heard a Eurasian Green Woodpecker (quite local) and even better, a singing Wood Warbler! I had seen hundreds of the latter on my recent trip to Italy but they are a rare species in western Netherlands. It was easy to track down as it moved between exposed perches in the understory singing his heart out!

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A poor “record” shot of the Wood Warbler 

Bouyed by my early success and very much enjoying the beautiful spring woods around me I pressed on reaching the scrubby forest habitat soon afterward. Greater Whitethroates were singing from seemingly every shrub and I found my only Tree Pipit of the day followed by a surprise Hawfinch foraging quietly in the canopy of an oak. Movement on the ground below it drew my attention to a male Eurasian Bullfinch, another species I had expected to miss! Up ahead I could hear a Common Redstart singing at a clearing edge and as I made my way towards it my only Northern Goshawk of the day flew over.

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Hawfinch

Moving northward I encountered some proper dune scrub where I was very pleased to hear the cascading notes of a singing Wood Lark, a species I was unsure I would be able to pick up. Here there was also a European Stonechat and my first Common Swifts of the day foraged overhead. With most of the expected species in the bag for the habitats I had been through I spent the next half hour biking out to the coast at Ijmuiden. South of the Ijmuiden pier is a small lake surrounded by reeds and willow scrub and here I came across my first Eurasian Reed Warblers, Bank Swallows, Garden Warbler and a beautiful male Bluethroat. As I made my way back to where I’d dumped my bike I finally heard a Lesser Whitethroat, a species I had been expecting earlier and one I was beginning to worry I would miss.

At the base of the Ijmuiden south pier a lone Barnacle Goose was loafing on the beach with the ubiquitous Herring Gulls, a few Mew Gulls and several Common and Sandwich Terns. Along the pier itself were dozens of Ruddy Turnstones foraging on the rocks with the odd European Oystercatcher as well as a lone Dunlin and two Common Sandpipers. Just as I was about to leave I spotted a distant dark blob on the water. I started biking further out the pier to get closer but it took off and circled around the end of the pier. It was distant, but luckily it came close enough to confirm it was a Common Scoter! I had been hoping for a lingering one as they are reported from here with some regularity but I had all but given up after a fruitless 20 minutes of sea-watching prior to this birds appearance.

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As always seems to be the case on a Big Day, I was behind my very loose “schedule” so I made a push to get back to the train station where I arrived with a couple minutes to spare to catch the 11:20 train back into Amsterdam. Hopping off at Sloterdijk station I biked the half hour south to the Amsterdamse Bos (Amsterdam Forest) where I had only a few targets left to find. At the park entrance I heard the hoped for Alexandrine Parakeet, a species with a small introduced population in the city. My remaining targets for the Bos were Stock Dove, Long-tailed Tit and Sedge Warbler and my first stop was a viewing platform over a patch of wetland, perfect I hoped for spotting flyby doves. A Common Cuckoo was putting on a show, singing and flying between perches around me. Unfortunately, nary a dove had flown past, indeed nary a BIRD had flown by – it seemed mid-day was not the time to be dove-watching. I decided to carry on to where I had a singing Sedge Warbler last summer. This too proved fruitless as despite many Chiffchaffs, Willow Warblers and other species being in full song my target was not. As I did not have a specific spot for my final target the Long-tailed Tit and would have further opportunities for it, I decided to head to Amstelpark where I knew a pair of White Storks nested. Sure enough, one was on the nest when I arrived.

Out of food and needing to pick up my scope at the apartment I headed home. A check of the bus schedule showed that I had an hour before I needed to leave to catch the bus out the east side of the city to the Durgerdam area so I decided a quick nap was in order. Of course, I accidentally set my alarm for “weekends” and overslept by 10 minutes! Rushing to get to the bus station I was relieved to see the bus still there however, an extra few seconds struggling to detach my tripod from my bike cost me as the bus pulled away just as I was stepping onto the platform. I had not been looking forward to biking over the two bridges between me and my destination, especially as I would be going into the wind, but there was nothing for it but to bite the bullet so I reattached my tripod and started peddling.

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Eurasian Spoonbill

Arriving at the fields north of Durgerdam I quickly spotted my first Great Egret of the day. On the other side of the road a Eurasian Kestrel hovered. Despite the habitat seeming perfect I couldn’t hear any Eurasian Skylarks singing and I would ultimately miss them, along with Meadow Pipit despite returning via this route – I suspect the fairly brisk breeze had something to do with it. At Uitdamerdijk and a wetland nearby I was hoping to pick up a few waterfowl and several shorebirds. The first stop had the usual locals such as Common Redshank and Black-tailed Godwit and across the way I could see several Northern Shovelers. A little further along the dike I reached the edge of the Makermeer, a man-made lake, where an enclosed bay is often quite good for shorebirds. Unfortunately the water level was high and only a few slivers of shore were available. A couple dozen Eurasian Spoonbills foraged along these and a couple pairs of Red-crested Pochards were in the bay along with the common ducks but no lingering wigeon or teal. A sharp “tseep” overhead alerted me to my only Western Yellow Wagtail of the day flying over. My final stop in the area was along the shore of the pond that held the Shovelers where there was a bit more exposed mud but only the locally breeding shorebird species. A lone immature Great-blacked Gull loafed with them and finally, I heard a Sedge Warbler – big relief! The surrounding fields held several hundred Barnacle Geese but no Meadow Pipit or Skylark.

It was 7:30 and I had one more area to visit so I slogged back across the bridges towards the city. Atop the second bridge I was surprised to hear a Cetti’s Warbler give a burst of song. Stopping to make sure of it I did not hear it again. Doubting myself I was contemplating moving on when again it sang, yes, definitely a Cetti’s! It seems as if maybe a few pairs (or at least singing males) are present in the city year round but this was the first time I had encountered one (although again, I had seen and heard several in Rome on the aforementioned Italy trip).

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Little Grebes may have been AWOL but Great Crested Grebes were common

Continuing along the banks of the Rhine Canal I stopped at a pond in the south of Diemer Park where I found the hoped for male Common Pochard, one of the last species I had a realistic hope of seeing. One more target remained (having given up hope on the Long-tailed Tits), Little Grebe, a species I had found a few pairs of in April at the nearby Diemer Vijshoek. Nearing the trailhead for this protected area I could hear a soft, insect-like buzzing coming from a reed bed at the side of the bike path. Stopping I compared it on my phone to the songs of a couple warbler species and yes, it fit Savi’s Warbler! I tried in vain to see it, as it would be a lifer for me, but it wouldn’t budge from wherever it was hunkered down. Still, another new species and an unexpected one at that and one that made up for the fact that there was no sign of any Little Grebes, despite checking several ponds and the shoreline around the park edge.

It was 9:35pm and the day was drawing to a close, as was my Birdathon. My weary legs slowly pedalled me homeward and as I contemplated my day I was brought back to the present by another Cetti’s Warbler singing from the willows beside me. My second Cetti’s and a fine finish to an exhausting, but exhilarating day!

Once home, and after a very late dinner of leftover dahl and naan from the night before, I submitted my ebird checklists and waited for my day totals to be summarized. 95 Species was the final count! I had figured that with good luck with lingering early migrants/wintering waterfowl 100 species would be a realistic hope and given I was lacking in those departments, as well as missing several shorebirds that I had hoped for, this was a very respectable tally!

Thank you to all who have contributed to my Birdathon, proceeds from which will go towards funding the migration monitoring program here at TLBO. To make a contribution please go to:

https://www.canadahelps.org/en/charities/bird-studies-canada/p2p/birdathon/page/averys-birdathon-for-tlbo/

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After two months of banding we are done for the season here at TLBO. We had an excellent last day of banding as you can see from Anna’s post yesterday and I felt a little sad taking down the nets knowing there would be no more censuses this year, no bags of birds lined up in the lab waiting to be processed, and no more beautiful sunrises that cover the Niuts in a reddish glow each morning. Since arriving at the start of August the Tatlayoko Valley has found its way into my heart and I hope it will not be too long before I visit again.

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This season has been a very low volume season with 1087 birds banded, the lowest number banded at this station. We have speculated that this may be due to the intense fire season in British Columbia and this data could be very valuable in helping to determine the effect that forest fires may have on bird populations.

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Graph depicting total numbers of birds banded for each year TLBO has been in operation

While the volume of song birds was very low this season we had a record high capture rate of Northern Saw-whet Owls (NSWO) with 59 individuals banded. The previous high was in 2012 with 31 individuals banded. One of the NSWO’s banded on Sept. 18th was recaptured at Rocky Point Bird observatory on the 27th.

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Graph depicting NSWO banding totals showing total banded each year (in blue) as well as the number of nights spend banding (in red).

We have had a few first records this year including the first Black-headed Grosbeak observed and the first Chestnut-backed Chickadee banded. We also banded the first Merlin caught in standard mistnets. This was a also a first banding tick for me. Previously I had only banded in Ontario so I have been lucky enough to have many banding “ticks” at the station this year. My personal favourite was being able to band not one but two Northern Harriers (four were banded here this season). Other personal banding highlights were Varied Thrush, Steller’s Jay, Mountain Chickadee and a myriad of western empidomax flycatchers. The empids are a notoriously hard group of species to identify in the field (or in the hand for that matter) and it was nice to get a close look and confirm with measurements to help improve my field ID.

Overall I have had a fantastic time at TLBO and have many people to thank and hope I do not miss anyone. BC Spaces for Nature, NCC, Joerg Fischer for his charitable donations, Avery Bartels for finding time to answer my multitude of questions while running RPBO, Candice Ford for allowing us to invade her space and the amazing residents of Tatlayoko who made us feel very welcome. I want to thank Anna who has been an excellent assistant bander and a great well of knowledge to tap into. Lastly, and certainly not least I want to thank the volunteers who have donated their time and energy into making this season work.

I will leave you with a photo I have posted before. this is one of the first photos I took of the mountains here on a calm day which only captures a hint of the true beauty of this valley.

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The Niuts reflecting off the calm lagoon. Once again the photo is flipped upside down!

Happy birding!

-Kyle Cameron

Total Banded 1105
Species Banded 56
Total Recapped 144
Species Recapped 21
Species Recorded 132

Species Banded Recapped
Lincoln’s Sparrow 189 26
Song Sparrow 156 34
Common Yellowthroat 112 36
Swainson’s Thrush 90 12
Northern Saw-whet Owl 59 0
Warbling Vireo 52 1
Savannah Sparrow 44 1
Orange-crowned Warbler 40 0
Yellow Warbler 35 2
White-crowned Sparrow 33 5
Wilson’s Warbler 32 0
Oregon Junco 29 0
American Redstart 28 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 22 0
Northern Waterthrush 21 1
MacGillivray’s Warbler 20 3
Black-capped Chickadee 15 9
Hermit Thrush 13 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 11 0
Chipping Sparrow 10 0
Cedar Waxwing 9 5
Dusky Flycatcher 8 0
Fox Sparrow 6 1
Townsend’s Warbler 5 0
Vesper Sparrow 5 0
Varied Thrush 5 0
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 4 0
Northern Harrier 4 0
Willow Flycatcher 3 1
Spotted Towhee 3 1
Downy Woodpecker 3 1
Cassin’s Vireo 3 0
Sharp-shinned Hawk 3 0
Red-eyed Vireo 3 0
Brown Creeper 3 0
Hammond’s Flycatcher 2 0
Red-breasted Nuthatch 2 0
American Robin 2 0
Steller’s Jay 2 0
Evening Grosbeak 2 0
Pileated Woodpecker 2 0
Golden-crowned Kinglet 1 0
Western Tanager 1 0
Indigo Bunting 1 0
Cooper’s Hawk 1 0
Least Flycatcher 1 0
Mountain Chickadee 1 0
Pacific Wren 1 0
Marsh Wren 1 0
Clay-colored Sparrow 1 0
Lazuli Bunting 1 0
Red-winged Blackbird 1 0
Purple Finch 1 0
Merlin 1 0
Western Wood-pewee 1 0
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 1 0
Red-naped Sapsucker 0 1
Hairy Woodpecker 0 1

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This is it, the last monitoring day of the season. For the first time during the season, we banded Song Sparrows and Song Sparrows, and…Song Sparrows. Mostly just them in the nets, wherever we went. A total of 16 Song Sparrows out of 24 birds banded. But then near the last net round, I heard Kyle say on the radio: “…come to net 14!”. This is the “jackpot net 14” that constantly captures the highest number of birds. I ran there, not sure what to expect, and then found myself facing two Pileated Woodpeckers. The rest is history. Kyle told us about the first and last Pileated Woodpecker he banded, also on the last monitoring day, at Innis Point Bird Observatory (Ottawa, ON). Strange? There’s more.

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Pileated Woodpecker, male. Females do not have red on the forecrown, nor on the malar stripe, both of which would instead be black.

Last night, the last owling night of the season, we closed with six owls–and the northern lights. It was our first time seeing them in the valley. We all agreed that we had never seen such exceptional, colourful northern lights before, dancing and pulsing. They were covering about half of the sky.

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Northern lights after the peak. Photo by Kyle.

Stay tuned for the recap of the season (!); Kyle will write it tomorrow. We took down all the nets this afternoon, packed up all monitoring equipment and organized the station. All that is left is to submit data in the monitoring database and pack up our personal belongings, and we’re good to go.

My last two months had been a remarkable experience. I thank everyone involved in making this experience possible, including Avery, without whom I would not be here; Kyle; Candice; Hana; Sally; the exceptional volunteers, Constanza, Gwyn, Laurel and Sachi; Peter; the visiting students and their relatives; and many other great and generous people.

Take care, everyone,

Anna.

Total Banded 1089
Species Banded 56
Total Recapped 144
Species Recapped 21
Species Recorded 132

Species Banded Recapped
Lincoln’s Sparrow 189 26
Song Sparrow 156 34
Common Yellowthroat 112 36
Swainson’s Thrush 90 12
Warbling Vireo 52 1
Savannah Sparrow 44 1
Northern Saw-whet Owl 43 0
Orange-crowned Warbler 40 0
Yellow Warbler 35 2
White-crowned Sparrow 33 5
Wilson’s Warbler 32 0
Oregon Junco 29 0
American Redstart 28 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 22 0
Northern Waterthrush 21 1
MacGillivray’s Warbler 20 3
Black-capped Chickadee 15 9
Hermit Thrush 13 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 11 0
Chipping Sparrow 10 0
Cedar Waxwing 9 5
Dusky Flycatcher 8 0
Fox Sparrow 6 1
Townsend’s Warbler 5 0
Vesper Sparrow 5 0
Varied Thrush 5 0
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 4 0
Northern Harrier 4 0
Willow Flycatcher 3 1
Spotted Towhee 3 1
Downy Woodpecker 3 1
Cassin’s Vireo 3 0
Sharp-shinned Hawk 3 0
Red-eyed Vireo 3 0
Brown Creeper 3 0
Hammond’s Flycatcher 2 0
Red-breasted Nuthatch 2 0
American Robin 2 0
Steller’s Jay 2 0
Evening Grosbeak 2 0
Pileated Woodpecker 2 0
Golden-crowned Kinglet 1 0
Western Tanager 1 0
Indigo Bunting 1 0
Cooper’s Hawk 1 0
Least Flycatcher 1 0
Mountain Chickadee 1 0
Pacific Wren 1 0
Marsh Wren 1 0
Clay-colored Sparrow 1 0
Lazuli Bunting 1 0
Red-winged Blackbird 1 0
Purple Finch 1 0
Merlin 1 0
Western Wood-pewee 1 0
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 1 0
Red-naped Sapsucker 0 1
Hairy Woodpecker 0 1

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Today we all woke up in a fog. No, literally a thick valley bottom fog that took its sweet time dissipating. When the sun finally burned it off we were treated to a bluebird day filled with all the golden, orange and red hues of the fall.

With respect to banding today was a bit more active than yesterday seeing 14 birds banded of 8 species and 4 recaptures comprised of 4 species. The highlight of the day was our first Mountain Chickadee of the season! This little bird inspired some pretty inventive puns from Kyle as it was his first time banding a Mountain Chickadee. The Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli) is one of the 4 species of chickadees that can be seen in this valley. This tiny bird can be best differentiated from its cousins by a distinctive white stripe over the eye which always makes me think of a backwoods outlaw or a bandit. If you use the Black-capped Chickadee’s call as a reference point the Mountain’s call is harsh – often described as “scolding” while the Chestnut-backed sounds more like a squeaky toy and the Boreal is nasal and scratchy.

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Our Mountain Chickadee, note the white stripe above the eye – photo credit Anna

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A closeup of his deformed bill due to a possible lack of nutrients while in the nest. Poor guy – photo credit Anna

Today we observed multiple large groups of Black-capped Chickadees and Oregon Dark-eyed Juncos foraging in the fall light. Whenever I turned my head, there was a Golden-crowned kinglet vocalizing as it fluttered from branch to branch.  Raptors were absent with a Cooper’s Hawk as our only sighting. The 2 Chestnut-Backed Chickadees were sighted again along with a single Brewer’s Blackbird. The highlight of the day for me was seeing my first Swamp Sparrow. This is the 9th recorded sighting at the station (according to eBird) of this rare migrant to the valley. They are very striking with bright rufus wings and crown with solid grey on the sides of their necks giving the appearance (to me that is) of wearing a fancy hood.

Come sunset we will embark on our last night of owling. Fingers crossed that we get some owls as it would be nice to end the owling season much like it began. Also, this will be my final TLBO blog post for the season. Thank you for reading along and bearing with my rambling posts.

Happy birding!

Cheers,

-Sachi

Total Banded 1065
Species Banded 55
Total Recapped 143
Species Recapped 21
Species Recorded 132

Species Banded Recapped
Lincoln’s Sparrow 188 26
Song Sparrow 140 33
Common Yellowthroat 112 36
Swainson’s Thrush 90 12
Warbling Vireo 52 1
Savannah Sparrow 44 1
Northern Saw-whet Owl 43 0
Orange-crowned Warbler 40 0
Yellow Warbler 35 2
White-crowned Sparrow 33 5
Wilson’s Warbler 32 0
Oregon Junco 29 0
American Redstart 28 2
Northern Waterthrush 21 1
MacGillivray’s Warbler 20 3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 20 0
Black-capped Chickadee 15 9
Hermit Thrush 11 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 11 0
Chipping Sparrow 10 0
Cedar Waxwing 9 5
Dusky Flycatcher 8 0
Fox Sparrow 5 1
Townsend’s Warbler 5 0
Vesper Sparrow 5 0
Varied Thrush 5 0
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 4 0
Northern Harrier 4 0
Willow Flycatcher 3 1
Spotted Towhee 3 1
Downy Woodpecker 3 1
Cassin’s Vireo 3 0
Sharp-shinned Hawk 3 0
Red-eyed Vireo 3 0
Brown Creeper 3 0
Hammond’s Flycatcher 2 0
Red-breasted Nuthatch 2 0
American Robin 2 0
Steller’s Jay 2 0
Evening Grosbeak 2 0
Golden-crowned Kinglet 1 0
Western Tanager 1 0
Indigo Bunting 1 0
Cooper’s Hawk 1 0
Least Flycatcher 1 0
Mountain Chickadee 1 0
Pacific Wren 1 0
Marsh Wren 1 0
Clay-colored Sparrow 1 0
Lazuli Bunting 1 0
Red-winged Blackbird 1 0
Purple Finch 1 0
Merlin 1 0
Western Wood-pewee 1 0
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 1 0
Red-naped Sapsucker 0 1
Hairy Woodpecker 0 1

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Opened nets at 8:30 this morning because of juuust enough raindrops to be of concern. I went on census walk with Kyle. It was a quiet morning with 22 species censused.  A funny highlight: As we were nearing the lake, as part of the census route, I was thinking about Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), particularly how I have not seen any since I left Washington, then, a perfect representative of the species exited a tree very close to us. It felt like I materialized it with my reverent thoughts.

Picidae is the family of birds that includes Woodpeckers. We banded three today! One Hairy woodpecker and two Downy woodpeckers (double-down). These two species look nearly identical in the field high up above spectators’ heads, so a quick trick to determine Hairy vs. Downy is by the length of bill in relation to head length. Hairys’ bills are roughly the same length as the head while Downys’ bills are about 1/3 of the head length. I think Anna’s hand can attest to the larger size of a Hairy’s bill! Anyway, we banded three but there were two more in close vicinity.  Kyle trotted back with the two Downys and told us that while he was extracting them there were 2 Hairys watching him do so from a nearby tree.

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Hairy Woodpecker gently yet firmly grasped by Anna’s right hand.

Additionally, today was a day of RECAPS (recaptured birds).  When we get these, unless we banded them earlier that same day, we take measurements as usual and let them go. We had 6 recaps and only 6 newly banded individuals. Kyle banded 5 owls. No owl recaps yet.

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Us.

Welp, thats all I got for today.  Also, seeing as we are done for the season on the 28th, this is my final blog entry. Bye friends!

-Laurelllll

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September 25th, 2017

In direct contrast to the start of the season it seems like we have had more rain than sunshine in the past few days. We were unable to open nets until 9:30 this morning due to rain. Once the nets were open we were treated to two Varied Thrush and a first for the season – a Steller’s Jay. Sachi enjoys the enthusiasm and excitement that Anna and I get from seeing these birds that he has seen many times. I am sure we would also enjoy his excitement at seeing Blue Jays in Ontario.

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The temperature has risen from our previous week of freezing conditions in the morning  but the trees sense fall is here and have begun turning glorious colours. The sparse aspen trees in the mountains are splashes of gold among the deep green pine and fir. Around the station the Gooseberry leaves are turning red producing another beautiful contrast.

Happy Birding!

-Kyle

Total Banded 1020
Species Banded 57
Total Recapped 132
Species Recapped 17
Species Recorded 147

 

 

 

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September 24th, 2017

We had the honour of having Candice at the station. In her presence, we banded a second Varied Thrush and saw two Ruffed Grouse fall through the net and make holes, one at least the size of a medium pizza (Sachi’s words). It was a slow day today, with ten birds banded and five recaps. Other than the Varied Thrush, the MacGillivray’s Warbler was a nice bird in the net after a hiatus of weeks.

The TLBO Potluck event was held yesterday evening. We went “owling”, but did not get any owl when everyone was there, unfortunately. The round after most left, there was one owl–and a total of four owls for the night. Thanks to everyone for coming, and to Hana and Candice for organizing. We thought the event was fun and educational, and I hope those who attended think so too. Come again, weather permitting; our last owl day should be the 27th!

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Kyle’s presentation at the potluck.

Until later!

Anna

Total Banded 1029
Species Banded 53
Total Recapped 132
Species Recapped 15
Species Recorded 130

Species Banded Recapped
Lincoln’s Sparrow 185 25
Song Sparrow 135 31
Common Yellowthroat 111 36
Swainson’s Thrush 90 12
Warbling Vireo 52 1
Savannah Sparrow 43 1
Northern Saw-whet Owl 43 0
Orange-crowned Warbler 39 0
Yellow Warbler 35 2
White-crowned Sparrow 33 2
Wilson’s Warbler 32 0
American Redstart 28 2
Oregon Junco 23 0
Northern Waterthrush 21 1
MacGillivray’s Warbler 20 3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 14 0
Black-capped Chickadee 13 9
Yellow-rumped Warbler 11 0
Chipping Sparrow 10 0
Cedar Waxwing 9 5
Hermit Thrush 9 0
Dusky Flycatcher 8 0
Vesper Sparrow 5 0
Townsend’s Warbler 5 0
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 4 0
Northern Harrier 4 0
Fox Sparrow 4 0
Willow Flycatcher 3 1
Red-eyed Vireo 3 0
Cassin’s Vireo 3 0
Sharp-shinned Hawk 3 0
Spotted Towhee 3 0
Brown Creeper 3 0
Hammond’s Flycatcher 2 0
American Robin 2 0
Red-breasted Nuthatch 2 0
Downy Woodpecker 2 0
Varied Thrush 2 0
Lazuli Bunting 1 0
Cooper’s Hawk 1 0
Marsh Wren 1 0
Golden-crowned Kinglet 1 0
Pacific Wren 1 0
Western Tanager 1 0
Least Flycatcher 1 0
Red-winged Blackbird 1 0
Indigo Bunting 1 0
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 1 0
Western Wood-pewee 1 0
Purple Finch 1 0
Merlin 1 0
Evening Grosbeak 1 0
Red-naped Sapsucker 0 1

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